Labor

  • May 14, 2024

    Mexican Mine Labor Row Ruled Outside Trade Pact's Scope

    An international tribunal formed under the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement declined to examine if workers at a Mexican mine were denied collective bargaining rights, finding that much of the 17-year dispute had already been decided under now-defunct labor laws.

  • May 14, 2024

    NLRB Official OKs UFCW Vote At Calif. Planned Parenthood

    A group of Planned Parenthood workers at six facilities in Southern California may vote on whether they want a United Food and Commercial Workers affiliate to represent them, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined, tossing the reproductive health care provider's arguments for a larger bargaining unit.

  • May 13, 2024

    NLRB Official Lets SoCal Nurses Vote On SEIU Representation

    Twelve registered nurses at a Southern California hospital are free to vote on representation by a Service Employees International Union local later this month, a National Labor Relations Board official has held, rejecting the hospital's claim that the nurses are union-ineligible supervisors.

  • May 13, 2024

    Amazon Can't Duck Order To ID Workers For Union Election

    A New York federal judge ordered Amazon on Monday to immediately turn over workers' contact information to a monitor overseeing a vote to elect the Amazon Labor Union's first officers, rejecting the company's request that she reconsider a May 9 decision.

  • May 13, 2024

    Workers At New Jersey Apple Store Vote Down Union

    Workers at an Apple Store in New Jersey voted against being represented by the Communications Workers of America as the union accused the company of using an "anti-union playbook" to sink the unionization effort.

  • May 13, 2024

    Imaging Co. Flouted Deal By Not Rehiring Worker, NLRB Says

    A medical imaging facility in the Los Angeles area wrongly laid off a union-represented worker in 2019, promised to reinstate her and then never did, the National Labor Relations Board found, ordering the facility to rehire the worker after five years.

  • May 13, 2024

    Starbucks Cracked Down On Union Gear, NLRB Judge Says

    Starbucks violated federal labor law by barring workers at a New York store from wearing union shirts on the job, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, saying the company allowed workers to wear shirts with logos supporting other causes.

  • May 13, 2024

    Rail Worker Wage Case Won't Get High Court Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't intervene in a pending Massachusetts lawsuit against the operator of a freight rail line over whether its employees are covered by the state's Prevailing Wage Act, declining Monday to review the case.

  • May 10, 2024

    Starbucks Fired Worker Over Early Closure, NLRB Judge Says

    Starbucks unlawfully fired a worker who closed a store early in protest of staffing issues, a National Labor Relations Board judge held Friday, saying the action was a protected strike and that the worker did not lose the protection of federal labor law during heated conversations with managers.

  • May 10, 2024

    American Airlines Worker Fights To Keep OT Suit Alive

    An American Airlines employee is trying again on a claim that the company owes him overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act, telling an Arizona federal judge Friday that the latest version of his complaint shows he's covered by the FLSA, not the Railway Labor Act. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Construction Co. Shakes Black Ex-Worker's Bias Suit

    A Washington federal judge granted a win Friday to a construction company in a Black ex-worker's lawsuit, saying he failed to show he was forced to quit because he complained about his manager's racist comments and not because of the 18 safety warnings he received.

  • May 10, 2024

    Biz Faked Closure After Union Vote, NLRB Judge Says

    An Illinois sprinkler installer committed a barrage of labor violations around its workers' overwhelming vote to unionize in late 2022, including by withholding Christmas turkeys and firing 10 perceived union backers in a false shutdown, a National Labor Relations Board judge said.

  • May 10, 2024

    Deal Reported In Union Production Workers' Benefits Fight

    A settlement is likely coming in a proposed class action filed by Parsec Inc. employees against the National Production Workers Union in Illinois federal court, signaling an end to claims that the rail transportation company's withdrawal from a collective bargaining agreement should have triggered the payout of severance and retirement funds.

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Police Officer's Bias Case

    This week, the Second Circuit is scheduled to consider a former Ramapo, New York, police officer's lawsuit claiming the town discriminated against her on the basis of her race and gender when it did not assign her a light duty assignment after she returned to the job from an injury. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 10, 2024

    Union Seeks To Force Kellanova To Arbitrate Wage Grievances

    The company formerly known as Kellogg Co. breached its union contract with a Bakery Confectionery Tobacco Workers & Grain Millers local by refusing to take two long-running wage grievances to arbitration, the union told a Michigan federal court Friday.

  • May 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs NLRB In Union Rep. Discipline Case

    A tape manufacturer's decision to punish two Michigan employees for not adequately cleaning their work areas was motivated by animus toward their actions as a union steward and a union committee member, the Sixth Circuit found, upholding a National Labor Relations Board ruling.

  • May 10, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: 9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Chief's Free Speech Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a former police chief's First Amendment case. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 09, 2024

    Tesla Illegally Imposed Tech Policy In Buffalo, NLRB GC Says

    National Labor Relations Board prosecutors accused Tesla of having an illegal policy to dissuade workers from unionizing at its Buffalo, New York, manufacturing plant, according to a copy of the complaint obtained by Law360 on Thursday, with agency prosecutors seeking a nationwide posting of workers' rights.

  • May 09, 2024

    NLRB Official Allows Union Vote For Joint Medical Employers

    A medical group and a Pacific Northwest healthcare system are joint employers, a National Labor Relations Board regional director concluded, greenlighting an election among medical providers to vote on representation by the Union of American Physicians and Dentists.

  • May 09, 2024

    Miami Ballet Can Unionize, NLRB Official Says

    Dancers in the Miami City Ballet can vote on representation by the American Guild of Musical Artists, a National Labor Relations Board official held, rejecting the ballet's claim that an existing labor contract forecloses the possibility of a union election.

  • May 09, 2024

    Labor Rights Murky As Gaza Protests Spill Into Work

    As protests over the Israel-Hamas war spill into the workplace, workers have accused their employers of suppressing their labor rights in a test of the National Labor Relations Act's nuanced protections for political advocacy.

  • May 09, 2024

    Amazon Must Provide Worker List In ALU Case

    A New York federal judge hearing a dispute over a leadership election at the Amazon Labor Union on Thursday ordered Amazon to turn over an employee mailing list to a neutral monitor, saying the information is necessary to notify members of the coming vote. 

  • May 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Panel Skeptical Of NLRB Hazard Pay Ruling

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned on Thursday a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a Michigan nursing home violated federal labor law with its handling of temporary hazard pay and staffing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with judges appearing skeptical the company had to bargain over the changes.

  • May 09, 2024

    Concrete Co. Illegally Toyed With Strikers, NLRB Judge Finds

    A New Jersey concrete manufacturer illegally told striking employees they could return to work only if they resigned from their Teamsters local, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, rejecting the company's argument that it shouldn't face a labor law violation because it rescinded the statement.

  • May 09, 2024

    NLRB Judge Finds 'Serious' ULPs At 2 Ohio Starbucks Stores

    Starbucks committed "serious and widespread unfair labor practices" at two stores in Cleveland where union organizing campaigns were underway, a National Labor Relations Board judge concluded, finding the coffee chain must read a notice to workers about their rights.

Expert Analysis

  • Starbucks Raise Ruling Highlights Labor Law Catch-22

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge recently ruled that Starbucks violated federal labor law when it gave raises to nonunion employees only, demonstrating that conflicts present in workforces with both union and nonunion employees can put employers in no-win situations if they don't consider how their actions will be interpreted, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Del. Ruling Shows Tension Between 363 Sale And Labor Law

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    The Delaware federal court's ruling in the Braeburn Alloy Steel case highlights the often overlooked collision between an unstayed order authorizing an asset sale free and clear of successor liability under Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code and federal labor law imposing successor liability on the buyer, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

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    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • Business Takeaways From Biden's Global Labor Rights Memo

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    President Joe Biden's recent memorandum on protecting worker rights is one of the most expansive statements the administration has made regarding international labor rights policy, and reflects several points of which businesses should take note, including the government’s interest in working with the private sector on these issues and a notable focus on the transition to clean energy, say Tom Plotkin and Pegah Nabili at Covington.

  • How Employers Should Prep For NLRB, OSHA Collaboration

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    The National Labor Relations Board and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recent announcement of increased interagency cooperation may suggest that each agency will be expanding its scope of inquiry moving forward, and signals that employers need to be prepared for inspections that implicate both OSHA and NLRB issues, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

  • 3 Evolving Issues Shaping The College Sports Legal Playbook

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    Conference realignment will seem tame compared to the regulatory and policy developments likely to transform college sports in the near future, addressing questions surrounding the employment status of student-athletes, athlete compensation and transgender athletes, say attorneys at O'Melveny.

  • Employer Lessons After 2023's Successful Labor Strikes

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    Following recent historic strikes in the automotive, entertainment and health care industries, employers of all types can learn key insights about how unions may approach negotiations and strikes going forward, and nonunionized workplaces should anticipate a drive for increased union membership, say Lenny Feigel and Mark Neuberger at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • Employers Should Review Training Repayment Tactics

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    State and federal examination of employee training repayment agreements has intensified, and with the potential for this tool to soon be severely limited, employers should review their options, including pivoting to other retention strategies, says Aaron Vance at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Extra NLRB Risks To Consider From Joint Employer Rule Edit

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s return to a broad definition of “joint employer” will expose companies — even those with only theoretical control of their outside consultants, contractors or franchise workers — to increased labor obligations and risks, further escalating their already expanding National Labor Relations Act liabilities, says William Kishman at Squire Patton.

  • AI At Work: Safety And NLRA Best Practices For Employers

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    There are many possible legal ramifications associated with integrating artificial intelligence tools and solutions into workplaces, including unionized workplaces' employer obligations under the National Labor Relations Act, and health and safety issues concerning robots and AI, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Employers Can Navigate NLRB's Pro-Employee Shift

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent decisions and general counsel memos mark the strong beginning of a trend toward greater pro-employee protections, so employers should proactively engage in risk management by revisiting their handbook policies accordingly, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

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