Labor

  • June 17, 2024

    Starbucks Cleared Over Firing Chicago-Area Lead Organizer

    Starbucks lawfully fired a union supporter who made a negative remark about a customer, a National Labor Relations Board judge concluded while also finding the company did violate federal labor law by telling the worker that they weren't thinking about their family when backing the union.

  • June 14, 2024

    GOP AGs Demand Stay For DOL's H-2A Protections Rule

    Seventeen Republican attorneys general requested a pause on the effective date for the U.S. Department of Labor's final rule covering foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program, telling the court that the rule provides protections that U.S. citizen agricultural workers lack under federal labor law.

  • June 14, 2024

    Starbucks Illegally Fired Ga. Worker, NLRB Judge Says

    Starbucks violated federal labor law when it fired a worker for leading a protest at a recently unionized Augusta, Georgia, cafe, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled Friday, adding Starbucks also flouted labor law by demanding the worker show the company his communications with Workers United.

  • June 14, 2024

    Teamsters Local Wants 26-Year-Old Consent Order To End

    A New York City-based Teamsters local asked the Second Circuit to unwind a 1998 consent order instructing the union to stop unlawful strike activity, saying the order is unnecessary after more than a quarter-century of "spotless compliance" by the union.

  • June 14, 2024

    Starbucks Bypassed Union Over Cut Hours, NLRB Judge Says

    Starbucks unlawfully slashed scheduled work hours for shift supervisors at a Pennsylvania store without giving a Teamsters local the chance to bargain, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, saying the company didn't show that it had a past practice of cutting these hours.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Forecast: Class Cert. Args In Four Seasons Layoff Suit

    This week, a New York federal judge will consider a motion to certify a class of former workers at the Four Seasons Hotel New York who claim the hotel violated federal and state law by not notifying them of furloughs and that the hotel denied them contractually required severance. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 14, 2024

    NLRB Rejects Columbia's Challenge To Union Composition

    Columbia University's student worker union includes those who logged fewer than 15 hours per week, the National Labor Relations Board ruled Friday, rejecting the university's argument that the United Auto Workers local should exclude them.

  • June 14, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for potential settlement approval in a pay stubs class action against Delta Air Lines that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • June 13, 2024

    Co.'s Noncompete Is 'Ridiculously Broad,' NLRB Judge Says

    A heating and air conditioning installation company in Indiana violated federal labor law by making workers sign an employment agreement with a noncompete, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled Thursday, calling the provision "ridiculously broad in scope."

  • June 13, 2024

    Bill Banning College Athletes As Workers Gets Committee Nod

    A U.S. House of Representatives panel on Thursday moved new legislation that would prohibit classifying student-athletes as employees of any institution, conference or association to the floor for a vote, as the bill's sponsor pushed back at what he described as the influence of big labor.

  • June 13, 2024

    NLRB Official Approves Union Vote At St. Louis Nonprofit

    Workers at a nonprofit human services agency in St. Louis can vote on representation by a Communications Workers of America local, a National Labor Relations Board official has ruled, siding with the local on what the bargaining unit will look like if the union wins the election.

  • June 13, 2024

    NLRB Says NY Administrative Law Judge Office Will Close

    The National Labor Relations Board said Thursday that the agency will close its New York City office of administrative law judges in July and transfer pending cases to Washington, D.C. 

  • June 13, 2024

    2 Firms Seek Lead Roles In Suit Over Shuttered Philly College

    Attorneys from Philadelphia-area law firms Edelson Lechtzin LLP and Willig Williams & Davidson have asked for appointment as interim co-lead counsel for a potential class of former University of the Arts employees who say the school's sudden closure violated federal statutes.

  • June 13, 2024

    NLRB Pauses Guard Vote Over Union Intervention Bid

    The National Labor Relations Board has granted a Service Employees International Union local's request to stay a representation election at a New York security company, indicating its willingness to consider whether the local was improperly excluded from the running and whether case law from 1984 should stand.

  • June 13, 2024

    NLRB Judge Dings Starbucks' Rule On Being Respectful

    Starbucks illegally maintained a policy telling workers to communicate in a professional and respectful way, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the coffee chain hadn't shown how the rule furthered its business interests.

  • June 12, 2024

    NLRB Chair Attacked At House Hearing As Nom Fight Looms

    Republican members on a U.S. House of Representatives labor subcommittee teed off on the National Labor Relations Board's direction under Democratic Chairman Lauren McFerran at a hearing Wednesday as their counterparts in the U.S. Senate consider her recent nomination for a third term.

  • June 12, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Halt SpaceX Appeal In Case Challenging NLRB

    The Fifth Circuit said Wednesday that it will continue weighing whether a Texas federal judge must pause an administrative suit against SpaceX from proceeding before the National Labor Relations Board, amid the company's constitutional challenge to the agency's structure.

  • June 12, 2024

    SEIU Unit On Hook For $6M In HCA Healthcare Strike Dispute

    An arbitrator has found a Service Employees International Union affiliate liable for more than $6 million in damages for replacement worker costs from a strike, a California hospital said Wednesday, while a union representative told Law360 that the decision is "outrageous and unprecedented."

  • June 12, 2024

    Home Depot Asks To Settle Claim It Shushed Worker On Probe

    Home Depot reached a proposed settlement to an allegation that it violated federal labor law by telling a Minneapolis worker to keep quiet about the company's investigation into his claims of racist treatment by a coworker, according to paperwork presented to a National Labor Relations Board judge.

  • June 12, 2024

    Massachusetts Pot Shop To Take Union Fight To 1st Circ.

    A Massachusetts cannabis retailer found to have engaged in union busting is appealing a district court order that directed it to bargain with a United Food and Commercial Workers local and to offer to rehire two fired union supporters.

  • June 12, 2024

    Union Ignored Dues Authorization Revocations, NLRB Says

    A security guards union violated federal labor law by continuing to collect dues from certain guards at the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington, D.C., after they revoked the union's authorization to do so, the National Labor Relations Board ruled.

  • June 12, 2024

    2nd Circ. Partially Nixes Injunction Over Amazon Firing

    The Second Circuit vacated on Wednesday a New York federal judge's order barring Amazon from firing workers for engaging in union activity, saying the judge did not explain why she imposed the broad prohibition while at the same time finding the company did not have to rehire a fired union activist.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    NCAA Settlement Could Aid Athletes' Employee Status Push

    A landmark settlement the NCAA announced in May in an antitrust class action brought by former college athletes reportedly sets a path for schools to share revenue with players, and experts said it could bolster active efforts to deem college athletes employees under federal labor law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Teamsters Unit Was 'Colluding With UPS,' Worker Says

    A UPS worker accused a Teamsters affiliate in Illinois federal court of violating its fair representation duty by "colluding" with the shipping giant to slash his hours and pay him incorrectly while also alleging that the company retaliated against him for an unfair labor practice charge.

Expert Analysis

  • Crafting An Effective Workplace AI Policy After DOL Guidance

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    Employers should take proactive steps to minimize their liability risk after the U.S. Department of Labor released artificial intelligence guidance principles on May 16, reflecting the reality that companies must begin putting into place policies that will dictate their expectations for how employees will use AI, say David Disler and Courtnie Bolden at ​​​​​​​Porzio Bromberg.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Cos. Must Stay On Alert With Joint Employer Rule In Flux

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    While employers may breathe a sigh of relief at recent events blocking the National Labor Relations Board's proposed rule that would make it easier for two entities to be deemed joint employers, the rule is not yet dead, say attorneys at ​​​​​​​Day Pitney.

  • One Contract Fix Can Reduce Employer Lawsuit Exposure

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    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling that saved FedEx over $365 million highlights how a one-sentence limitation provision on an employment application or in an at-will employment agreement may be the easiest cost-savings measure for employers against legal claims, say Sara O'Keefe and William Wortel at BCLP.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Time For Congress To Let Qualified Older Pilots Keep Flying

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    While a previous Law360 guest article affirmed the current law requiring airline pilots to retire at age 65, the facts suggest that the pilots, their unions, the airlines and the flying public will all benefit if Congress allows experienced, medically qualified aviators to stay in the cockpit, say Allen Baker and Bo Ellis at Let Experienced Pilots Fly.

  • Game-Changing Decisions Call For New Rules At The NCAA

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    From a newly formed college players union to coaches transferring at the drop of a hat, the National College Athletic Association needs an overhaul, including federal supervision, says Frank Darras at DarrasLaw.

  • What Makes Unionization In Financial Services Unique

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    Only around 1% of financial services employees are part of a union, but that number is on the rise, presenting both unique opportunities and challenges for the employers and employees that make up a sector typically devoid of union activity, say Amanda Fugazy and Steven Nevolis at Ellenoff Grossman.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • Employers Beware Of NLRB Changes On Bad Faith Bargaining

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    Recent National Labor Relations Board decisions show a trend of the agency imposing harsher remedies on employers for bad faith bargaining over union contracts, a position upheld in the Ninth Circuit's recent NLRB v. Grill Concepts Services decision, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.