Wage & Hour

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Wedbush Waived Arbitration Flag Too Late

    A U.S. Supreme Court might have changed the arbitration landscape in suits involving California's Private Attorneys General Act, but Wedbush Securities Inc. still waited too long to try pushing out of court financial advisers' claims, a California state appeals court ruled.

  • April 19, 2024

    Package Couriers Want Quick Appeal In OT Suit

    A package courier asked an Ohio federal judge Friday to greenlight an appeal to the Sixth Circuit regarding the decertification of a collective of workers alleging a delivery company misclassified them as independent contractors and denied them overtime pay, saying an appeal could expedite the lawsuit.

  • April 19, 2024

    Farmworkers Must Clarify FLSA Release In Wage Deal

    A California federal judge identified two issues with a proposed wage and hour settlement between a class of farmworkers and their employer, saying the deal inexplicably releases federal claims that were never filed and the parties haven't formally notified the court of a plaintiff's death.

  • April 19, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers School District Race Bias Suit

    This week a New York federal judge will consider a school district's bid to dismiss a lawsuit brought by a Black former technology specialist who claims he was fired after facing discrimination on the job based on his race. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 19, 2024

    Oilfield Services Co. Wants Worker's OT Suit Arbitrated

    An oilfield services company told a Texas federal judge to send an ex-oil rig worker's unpaid overtime suit into arbitration, saying the workers had signed binding, valid arbitration agreements.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Hilton Seeks To Undo Tips Class

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for a potential ruling on whether a class of hotel banquet event workers can continue together with wage claims against San Francisco Hilton Inc., in a long-running case that paid a visit to the Ninth Circuit. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • April 19, 2024

    Aviation Services Co. Paid Only Scheduled Shifts, Suit Says

    An aviation services company ignored work that a former training specialist did outside her scheduled shifts, the worker told a Washington federal court, accusing the company in a proposed class and collective action of owing workers wages.

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Awards $98M To Wash. Healthcare Workers In Wage Suit

    A Seattle jury said Thursday a Washington-based healthcare system should pay thousands of its employees almost $100 million for its illegal timeclock rounding and meal break practices, an award that's expected to be doubled because a judge has already determined that the company's violations were willful.

  • April 18, 2024

    Qdoba To Pay $3.8M To Wrap Up Wash. Pay Transparency Suit

    Mexican restaurant chain Qdoba will pay $3.8 million to resolve a class action alleging it violated Washington state's pay transparency law when it failed to disclose pay information in job postings, according to a filing in state court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Calif. Grocery Stores Pay $472K For OT Violations

    Three California grocery stores paid more than $472,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 60 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Building Groups Say They Can Fight Prevailing Wage Rule

    Several construction trade groups told a Texas federal judge that they don't need to point to specific members to support their argument that a U.S. Department of Labor final rule regulating prevailing wages will hurt them, urging the court to keep alive their suit challenging the rule.

  • April 18, 2024

    NY Appeals Court Revives AI Firm CLO's Claim For Pay

    In a significant ruling for executives and professionals, a New York state appeals court has reversed the dismissal of key claims in a former chief legal officer's lawsuit alleging he wasn't paid all wages owed after his employment ended at artificial intelligence company Amelia US LLC.

  • April 18, 2024

    Saladworks Operator Misclassified Asst. Managers, Suit Says

    A Pennsylvania-based franchisee of fast-casual salad eatery Saladworks misclassified its assistant managers as overtime-exempt even though they should have earned time-and-a-half wages for overtime hours, a former manager alleged in a proposed collective action filed in federal court Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Buffalo Wild Wings Owes Pay For OT Work, Server Says

    Buffalo Wild Wings has not been paying its hourly employees overtime wages for time they spent working off the clock and didn't reimburse them for business expenses or allow them to take breaks, a server alleged in a proposed class action filed in California federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    US Chamber, Groups Seek Win In DOL Contractor Rule Spat

    The U.S. Department of Labor acted illegally when it nixed a Trump-era rule determining workers' independent contractor status and issued a new rule, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and a slew of trade groups told a Texas federal court.

  • April 17, 2024

    Colo. Labor Dept. Says Amazon's Holiday Pay Must Be In OT

    The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment told the state Supreme Court that Amazon's holiday incentive pay is similar to shift differentials, backing warehouse workers' arguments that the pay should have been included in their overtime compensation.

  • April 17, 2024

    Drivers, Transport Cos.' $700K Wage Deal Nabs Initial OK

    A California federal judge placed the initial stamp of approval on a revised $700,000 settlement between a class of truck drivers, an agricultural product transportation company and labor contractor ending a wage lawsuit, saying the updated deal is an adequate resolution.

  • April 17, 2024

    Yacht Repair Co.'s Late Arguments Can't Save It From OT Suit

    A yacht repair company owes more than $55,000 in overtime and damages to a former employee, a Florida federal judge ruled, rejecting the company's Hail Mary argument that the worker was exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • April 17, 2024

    Airplane Servicers Nod to Justices, Reiterate That Fueling Isn't Interstate Work

    Two companies that service airplanes alerted the Ninth Circuit to the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision regarding the applicability of a worker exemption from the Federal Arbitration Act, saying the high court's ruling supports their contention that fuel pumping is not interstate work that would trigger the carveout.

  • April 17, 2024

    NJ Landscaping Co. Pays $255K For OT Violations

    A New Jersey landscaping company paid nearly $255,000 in back wages and damages for denying 20 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ogletree Expands Into Western NY With Ex-Goldberg Atty

    Management-side employment firm Ogletree Deakins is expanding into western New York, announcing Tuesday that it is adding a shareholder in Buffalo from Goldberg Segalla.

  • April 17, 2024

    Discovery In $500M Severance Fight Against X, Musk Will Wait

    A California federal judge paused discovery in a suit claiming X, formerly Twitter, owes $500 million in severance to the workers the company laid off after Elon Musk's takeover, saying the court should wait to sort out the company's dismissal bid.

  • April 17, 2024

    Military IT Contractor Didn't Pay OT, Ex-Worker Says

    A Virginia-based technology company that contracts with the U.S. military has not been paying its hourly employees time-and-a-half overtime premiums even though they regularly work more than 60 hours a week, according to a proposed class action filed in federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.