Wage & Hour

  • June 11, 2024

    Labcorp Workers' $2.4M Wage Deal Wins Court Approval

    A California federal judge placed the final stamp of approval on a $2.4 million deal ending class claims that Labcorp failed to pay overtime wages for the time carriers spent driving to and from locations and violated state meal and break laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Childcare Custodian's Weekly Wage Suit Can Continue

    A childcare center custodian can continue with his claim that the center operators failed to pay him weekly wages as state law requires for workers who perform manual labor, a New York federal judge ruled, but cut his claim that the center didn't provide proper wage notices.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs Strip Club And Dancers' $165K Wage Deal

    A South Florida strip club operator will pay $165,000 to dancers who claimed they were misclassified as independent contractors and denied minimum wages, under a settlement agreement approved by a federal judge.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    NM Restaurants Pay $254K For Tip, Wage Violations

    Two restaurant franchise locations in New Mexico paid more than $254,000 in back wages, damages and fines for keeping a portion of workers' tips and denying them minimum and overtime wage rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • June 11, 2024

    Parts Of Tesla Wage Suit To Lead To Arbitration, Judge Rules

    Twelve current and former Tesla employees will need to bring claims that they worked through meal and rest breaks to an arbitrator, a California federal judge ruled, rejecting arguments that their signatures on arbitration pacts were forged.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Papa John's Driver's Race Harassment, Pay Suit Proceeds

    A Black former pizza delivery driver for a Papa John's franchise can pursue his claims that he faced a hostile work environment and was underreimbursed for mileage, an Alabama federal judge ruled, but the judge limited the methods the worker can use to prove his allegations.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    Uber Black Drivers Aren't Like Plumbers, Philly Jury Told

    Uber Black drivers on Monday tried for a second time to convince a Pennsylvania federal jury that the ride-sharing company owes them the same perks as employees, saying they're nothing like plumbers, the quintessential independent contractors.

  • June 10, 2024

    Migrant Cleaners Rebuff Colo. Hotel's Bid To Ditch Wage Suit

    The migrant contractor staff that cleaned a Colorado luxury hotel slammed the hotel's efforts to escape claims of underpaying its workers, telling a Colorado federal court Monday that the hotel set the terms of their employment.

  • June 10, 2024

    Full 9th Circ. Rules AB5 And Its Exemptions Are Lawful

    The California Legislature had a plausible reason for creating certain carveouts from a state law governing whether workers are employees or independent contractors, the full Ninth Circuit ruled Monday, departing from a panel's decision that Assembly Bill 5 disfavors companies such as Uber.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Booted From Pa. Equal Pay Case

    Cozen O'Connor has been booted off a Pennsylvania school district's equal-pay lawsuit that was being overseen by a judge with personal ties to the firm, according to an order the judge issued Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FordHarrison Makes Associate Hires Across 5 Offices

    FordHarrison LLP announced that it made associate hires across five of the employment law firm's office locations including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

  • June 10, 2024

    Duane Morris Rehires Employment Partner From Cooley

    A labor and employment attorney who spent nearly two decades at Duane Morris LLP has rejoined the firm after working at Cooley LLP the past few years.

  • June 10, 2024

    LA County Defeats Firefighters' Quarantine OT Suit

    A firefighter was late to accuse Los Angeles County of failing to pay new firefighters for the time they spent quarantining during the COVID-19 pandemic while training, a California federal judge ruled, granting the county an early win.

  • June 10, 2024

    UPS Can't Escape Unpaid Security Screening Claims

    A New Jersey federal judge rejected UPS' request to toss claims that the delivery company should pay warehouse workers for the time they spent undergoing security screenings before their shifts started, court records show.

  • June 10, 2024

    Justices Won't Revisit Salary Basis Carveout To Overtime Pay

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday again declined to weigh in on the exemption to overtime pay under federal labor law for salaried workers in a case dealing with whether extra compensation on top of a salary does away with exemption status.

  • June 07, 2024

    NJ Equal Pay Law For Temp Workers Has Uncertain Future

    There is no doubt that the New Jersey Temp Worker Bill of Rights will upend the temp industry in the Garden State, and while a new challenge on the benefits pay provision may succeed, temp worker equal pay is likely here to stay, attorneys said.

  • June 07, 2024

    Exotic Dancers Win Class Status For State Law Wage Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has certified a class of exotic dancers who claim they were misclassified as independent contractors and compensated only in tips from customers and not in wages as employees, in violation of federal and state labor laws.

  • June 07, 2024

    Workers, DC Cleaning Co. Agree To Drop OT Suit

    A Washington, D.C.-area janitorial company and a group of workers told a federal judge Friday they agreed to end a collective action accusing the company of underpaying overtime wages through off-the-books payments for hours worked over 40.

  • June 07, 2024

    Package Co. Settles DC AG's Worker Misclassification Probe

    A package-receiving service for apartment buildings has agreed to pay over $150,000 to settle the Washington, D.C., attorney general office's investigation into allegations that workers who spent more than half their time in the city were misclassified by the company as independent contractors.

  • June 07, 2024

    NJ Asked To Convince Court Not To Block Temp Law

    A New Jersey federal judge ordered the state Friday to show why a new law broadening protections for temporary workers should stay in place, after a group of business associations raised new arguments that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act preempts the law.

  • June 07, 2024

    Cozen Adds Eckert Seamans Employment Pro In Boston

    Cozen O'Connor brought on a veteran employment lawyer from Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC in Boston, who comes with experience working in the public sector that he said allows him to help companies navigate any type of employment suit that comes their way. 

  • June 07, 2024

    Walmart Driver Misclassification Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A Washington federal judge sent to arbitration a proposed class action accusing Walmart of misclassifying its app-based delivery workers as independent contractors, saying the workers signed valid arbitration agreements.

Expert Analysis

  • Preparing For Potential Changes To DOL's Overtime Rules

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    While the U.S. Department of Labor is still reviewing employer exemptions from Fair Labor Standards Act wage and overtime requirements, and it is difficult to predict changes the department may ultimately propose, there are a few steps that employers can take now, say Juan Enjamio and Daniel Butler at Hunton.

  • Cost-Splitting Arbitration Clauses Threaten Workers' Rights

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    A recent Law360 guest article offered employers a guide to enforcing cost-splitting arbitration provisions in employment contracts but failed to recognize that these steps deter employees from asserting statutory claims for employment law violations, says Hugh Baran at Kakalec Law.

  • Pa.'s Changing Employment Laws In 2022 And Beyond

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    With pandemic concerns no longer drowning out other topics in Pennsylvania employment law, 2022 instead saw a variety of worker-friendly changes introduced at the state and local levels, a trend that may continue to grow in 2023 under Gov.-elect Josh Shapiro, say J.T. Holt and Claire Throckmorton at Reed Smith.

  • Musician Classification Pointers For Wash. Hospitality Cos.

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    Following a recent increase in audits by the Washington State Employment Security Department concerning hospitality employers’ classification of musical performers, businesses are strongly encouraged to assess state law requirements governing their relationship with hired talent and ensure written contracts are in place, say Emily Bushaw and Shannon McDermott at Perkins Coie.

  • Employer Ramifications From Wash. Prevailing Wage Ruling

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    After the Washington Supreme Court's recent ruling in Associated General Contractors v. Washington that altered how prevailing wage rates are set, employers of public works projects can expect to see higher wage rates for their employees, say Cassidy Ingram and Brett Hill at Ahlers Cressman.

  • In 2023, Pursue The 'Why' Behind Employment Compliance

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    As employers approach new compliance requirements that will take effect on Jan.1, considering why these laws and regulations were put in place — rather than what must be done to satisfy them — can open greater opportunities to move ahead of the curve and align actions with company values and culture, says Christopher Ward at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employee Pay Takeaways From Computer Startup Time Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Cadena v. Customer Connexx, which held that time spent booting up laptops is compensable, is a reminder of how the continuous workday rule affects employee pay and provides insight on whether other types of tasks are integral and indispensable, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • IRS Starts Clock On Energy Projects' Labor Rule Exemption

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    A U.S. Department of the Treasury notice published this week started the 60-day clock for clean energy projects seeking to be grandfathered from having to meet new labor requirements to qualify for enhanced tax credits, and uncertainty about how the provisions will apply should be incentive for some investors to begin construction soon, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Top 10 Labor And Employment Issues In M&A Transactions

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    In order to ensure that M&A transactions come to fruition in the current uncertain environment, companies should keep several labor and employment issues in mind during the due diligence process to minimize risk, says Cassidy Mara at Akerman.

  • Employer Lessons From Google's $118M Equal Pay Deal

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    The recent $118 million settlement in the Ellis v. Google class action over a systemic scheme directed at underpaying women can be used as the foundation for employers to implement better business practices and avoid lawsuits of this magnitude, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.

  • State Law Compliance Considerations For Remote Job Posts

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    In light of the increasing prevalence of state and local laws mandating a salary range on job listings, employers should provide pay transparency when looking for remote workers in order to avoid potential penalties and litigation, says Eric Fox at Gordon & Rees.

  • Employers Should Note Post-Midterms State Law Changes

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    State ballot measures in the recent midterm elections could require employers to update policies related to drug use, wages, collective bargaining and benefit plans that offer access to abortion care — a reminder of the challenges in complying with the ever-changing patchwork of state workplace laws, say attorneys at Jackson Lewis.

  • PAGA Claims Are A Gamble As Calif. Justices Mull Uber Case

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    The California Supreme Court's pending Private Attorneys General Act decision in Adolph v. Uber will have significant repercussions for both employers and employees, potentially forcing employers to question whether there is any benefit to arbitrating individual PAGA claims, says Jonathan Andrews at Signature Resolution.