Wage & Hour

  • May 31, 2024

    NYC Landlord Inks Deal To End Wage Theft Suit

    A former maintenance worker has agreed in principle to settle his proposed wage theft collective action against a New York City landlord and its property manager, according to a letter filed Friday in New York federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers IATSE Movie Pay Dispute

    This week, a New York federal judge will hear arguments over the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees' attempt to force a film production company to make wage and benefits payments the union claims it has not made as required under an arbitration award.

  • May 31, 2024

    Complaints About BC Tennis Coach Led To Firing, Suit Says

    A former assistant women's tennis coach at Boston College says the head coach of the program "set out on a campaign to undermine and alienate" her out of professional jealousy and gender bias, alleging she was fired in retaliation after complaining to administrators.

  • May 31, 2024

    Split NH High Court Says Cops Must Pay Back Sick Leave

    An updated version of a City of Manchester ordinance requires four police officers to pay the city back for the sick leave benefits they received while their compensation claims for on-the-job injuries were pending, a split New Hampshire Supreme Court ruled.

  • May 31, 2024

    Steptoe Adds To Employment Department In Pittsburgh Office

    A commercial litigator's plan to refocus her practice on employment law prompted a recent move to Steptoe & Johnson PLLC's Pittsburgh office after more than eight years with Sherrard German & Kelly P.C.

  • May 31, 2024

    Store Applicant Wants Pay Range Case In State Court ASAP

    A job applicant told a Washington federal judge not to grant retailer Aaron's bid to appeal to the Ninth Circuit his case accusing it of violating a state requirement to include pay ranges in job advertisements, saying it contradicts the company's claim the suit shouldn't be in federal court.

  • May 31, 2024

    Ex-OneMain Atty Joins Semmes' Baltimore Employment Team

    LaTonya D. Reynolds had early dreams of being an international corporate attorney, but a passion for finance and taxation, and later, employment law, ultimately led her to her new role as counsel in the labor and employment practice group of Semmes Bowen & Semmes in Baltimore.

  • May 31, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: State Justices To Hear 'Sovereignty' Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for oral arguments at the California Supreme Court regarding whether all public entities are exempt from certain state labor law wage requirements. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 31, 2024

    Customer Support Co. Assails DOL Early Win Bid In Wage Suit

    Employees for a customer support services company have control over their work and manage their own business, the company told a Florida federal court in its request to stop the U.S. Department of Labor from securing an early win in an independent contractor classification case.

  • May 31, 2024

    DOL Asks To Wait To Disclose Workers In Fishery Wage Case

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Mississippi federal court to halt the disclosure of the identities of some migrant workers who helped in the department's investigation of a fish farm, saying that it plans to ask the court to reconsider ordering the disclosure.

  • May 30, 2024

    9th Circ. Reopens Mandatory Security Check Wage Fight

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday largely revived a proposed wage class action by a subcontractor who sought to be paid for undergoing mandatory security checks and vehicle inspections at a solar project site, following the California Supreme Court's ruling that found the time to be compensable as "hours worked."

  • May 30, 2024

    Divided FTC Won't Delay Kroger-Albertsons In-House Case

    The Federal Trade Commission's three Democrats refused Wednesday to delay the agency in-house challenge to Kroger's $24.6 billion purchase of Albertsons, blaming the grocery giants for their scheduling challenges and drawing a sharp dissent from the FTC's two Republicans.

  • May 30, 2024

    DOL Says Hyundai Hired 13-Year-Old To Work Assembly Line

    Car companies SMART and Hyundai and a staffing agency employed a 13-year-old to work up to 60-hour weeks in an assembly line, the U.S. Department of Labor told an Alabama federal court Thursday, saying the labor "shocks the conscience."

  • May 30, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Faces Claim It Fired Worker Over Sick Husband

    A former legal assistant at Ballard Spahr LLP claims the firm fired her in retaliation for using the Family and Medical Leave Act to take time away from work to care for her cancer-stricken husband, according to a complaint filed in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • May 30, 2024

    Morgan & Morgan Settles Ex-Paralegal's FMLA Suit

    Morgan & Morgan PA reached a deal with a former paralegal ending her suit accusing the firm of interference and retaliation when she was unlawfully fired, she said, after requesting time off afforded by the Family and Medical Leave Act, the firm told a Florida federal judge Thursday.

  • May 30, 2024

    DOL Says Challenged Provision In DBA Rule Is Lawful

    The U.S. Department of Labor pressed a Texas federal court not to halt its final rule regulating prevailing wages under the Davis-Bacon Act, saying that one of the provisions several construction groups are challenging is completely lawful.

  • May 30, 2024

    Chauffeur Co. Agrees To Pay $2.5M In Wage Settlement

    A chauffeur company agreed to give $2.5 million to settle over 600 drivers' claims that it failed to pay them hourly or for overtime or maintain records as required by federal and state labor law, according to a bid to approve the deal filed in Arizona federal court.

  • May 30, 2024

    Atty Behind Supreme Court Wins Talks Arbitration Trends

    The U.S. Supreme Court has been seeing a lot of Daniel Geyser, a go-to appellate attorney who recently scored a win in the Smith v. Spizzirri employment case dealing with federal arbitration requirements, his second victory in such a case in just over two years. Law360 spoke with Geyser about his case successes and the road to those wins.

  • May 30, 2024

    Dental Co., Ex-Worker Agree To Arbitrate OT Spat

    A New York federal judge granted a former dental assistant's request to arbitrate her claims accusing a dental company of failing to pay hourly workers all their overtime wages owed or on a weekly basis as state law mandates for manual laborers.

  • May 30, 2024

    Gunster Bolsters Employment And Immigration Teams In Florida

    Gunster has hired two attorneys in two separate Florida offices who will continue their practices focused on labor and employment and immigration issues, the firm announced this week.

  • May 29, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Merrill Lynch Inks $20M Deal In Financial Advisers' Bias Suit

    Merrill Lynch has agreed to pay nearly $20 million to settle class action claims filed in Florida federal court alleging discrimination and retaliation against a proposed class of nearly 1,400 Black financial advisers who alleged they received less pay and promotions compared to their white counterparts. 

  • May 29, 2024

    Contractor Rule Combats Misclassification, Nonprofits Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's updated independent contractor classification rule is necessary to combat misclassification that a previous version of the rule exacerbated, two nonprofits said in a brief opposing business groups' challenge to the rule.

  • May 29, 2024

    McDonald's Wants Out Of Workers' Lactation Suit

    Two workers claiming McDonald's didn't provide sanitary places for employees to pump breast milk failed to show that the fast-food chain was their direct employer, the company told an Illinois federal court, urging it to toss the proposed collective suit.

  • May 29, 2024

    5th Circ. Says Arbitrator To Decide OT Collective's Status

    The Fifth Circuit found a proposed collective action seeking unpaid overtime should be sent into arbitration, where an arbitrator can decide whether the case can proceed on a representative basis, because the arbitration agreement's language states that question is within the arbitrator's purview.

  • May 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms Dismissal Of Doctor's Military Bias Suit

    An Arizona hospital defeated a doctor's discrimination lawsuit for the second time, with the Ninth Circuit upholding an Arizona federal judge's decision to toss the doctor's claims that the hospital showed bias against his military status by not renewing his contract after he deployed.

Expert Analysis

  • High Court FLSA Case Threatens OT Pay Landscape

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    The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide in Helix Energy Solutions v. Hewitt whether a high-paid oil rig worker is entitled to overtime compensation under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and its eventual opinion could bring a new class of employees within the purview of the law’s requirements, say Melissa Legault and Wade Erwin at Squire Patton.

  • Calif. Pay Stub Ruling Spotlights Overtime, Bonus Compliance

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    Though a California appellate court's recent ruling provides a simple answer to how employers must list true-up overtime wages on pay stubs, it also underscores the importance of reviewing compliance requirements for wage statements where bonuses or other factors affect regular rates, says Paul Lynd at ArentFox Schiff.

  • 11th Circ. Clarifies FLSA Administrative Exemption

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Fowler v. OSP Prevention Group about administrative employee determination under the Fair Labor Standards Act highlights the importance for employers to critically consider all required factors for an FLSA exemption, say Sarah Guo and Larry Perlman at Foley & Lardner.

  • Why Gig Platforms Should Be On Alert

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    The Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general have set their sights on the gig economy and practices they view as deceptive and unfair, which will open gig platforms to more scrutiny — and past cases against gig-economy giants including Uber and Instacart are cautionary tales to keep in mind, say attorneys at Venable.

  • More Employment Regs May See 'Major Questions' Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent use of the major questions doctrine to strike down regulation has already been cited in lower court cases challenging U.S. Department of Labor authority to implement wage and hour changes, and could provide a potent tool to litigants seeking to restrain federal workplace and labor regulations, say Jeffrey Brecher and Courtney Malveaux at Jackson Lewis.

  • What Employers Should Do To Prepare For Natural Disasters

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    As hurricane season picks up steam and extreme weather events become more erratic and uncertain in every region of the U.S., employers must put emergency action plans in place that address everything from compensation issues to leave requests, says Sally Culley at Rumberger Kirk.

  • Wage Theft Bill Would Increase Risk, Severity Of FLSA Claims

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    A recently introduced bill would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act in extreme ways that go well beyond the commonsense idea that people should be paid the wages they have earned, thereby sharply increasing the threat of claims against employers, with implications for arbitration, collective bargaining and more, say Christopher Pardo and Beth Sherwood at Hunton.

  • Gig Companies May Have To Live With The ABC Test In Calif.

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    Two recent cert denials by the U.S. Supreme Court has left California's ABC test for employment classification intact, and if gig companies' recent efforts to exempt certain workers from the test fail, they may be less eager to pursue similar challenges in California and beyond, says Ronald Zambrano at West Coast Employment Lawyers.

  • Cos. Face FMLA Quagmire Given New Mental Health Focus

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    The Seventh Circuit’s recent decision in Ziccarelli v. Dart, clarifying that merely discouraging an employee from exercising Family and Medical Leave Act rights may constitute unlawful interference, paired with new U.S. Department of Labor's mental health guidance, present unique challenges for employers, say Matthew Tyrrell and Adam Maxwell at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • How New Seattle Wage Law Will Affect Gig Economy Cos.

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    As state and local legislatures around the country consider additional labor protections for app-based workers, Seattle's new minimum wage for delivery drivers offers an example of how record-keeping and compliance requirements are changing for gig economy businesses, say Catharine Morisset and Lisa Nagele-Piazza at Fisher Phillips.

  • Beware The Risks In Laying Off Out-Of-State Remote Workers

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    Employers could run into unique legal risks when laying off remote, out-of-state employees if they're not familiar with varying state employment laws, but they can minimize the chances of potential penalties by reviewing payroll practices, applicable final paycheck laws and more, says Paul Cirner at Ogletree.

  • Why Justices' PAGA Ruling May Not Be Real Win For Cos.

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's Viking River decision last month, companies may temporarily cheer their reduced California Private Attorneys General Act exposure from court cases, but they may come to regret their enthusiasm as plaintiffs firms can pursue arbitration on a mass scale, says Aaron Blumenthal at Gibbs Law Group.

  • Justices Prolong Calif. Trucking Industry's Employment Woes

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent refusal to hear a trucking industry challenge to A.B. 5 — a California law that makes many truck drivers employees instead of independent contractors — only extends the struggle for a balanced approach to this issue that avoids paternalism and supports small businesses, says Gregory Feary at Scopelitis Garvin.