Wage & Hour

  • May 13, 2024

    Ind. Home Health Co. Pays $151K For OT Violations

    A home healthcare company in Indianapolis paid more than $151,000 in back wages and damages for denying 32 workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • May 13, 2024

    Delivery Co. Seeks To Halt Worker's Appeal Bid In OT Suit

    A delivery company urged an Ohio federal judge not to allow a package courier to appeal to the Sixth Circuit the decertification of a collective of workers alleging the company misclassified them as independent contractors, saying the appeal would not hasten the end of the dispute.

  • May 10, 2024

    Wash. Judge Doubles Hospital System's Penalty In Wage Case

    A Washington state judge has ordered a healthcare system to pay nearly $230 million to 33,000 workers, doubling the damages a jury awarded to the employees in April based on the company's "willful" violations of wage law.  

  • May 10, 2024

    Black Doctor Must Arbitrate Bias Claims Against Hospice Co.

    A Black doctor must arbitrate her claims that she was mistreated by non-Black colleagues at a home healthcare company and fired after raising concerns that it was sidestepping Medicare billing regulations, a California federal judge ruled, finding an arbitration agreement she signed is legitimate.

  • May 10, 2024

    American Airlines Worker Fights To Keep OT Suit Alive

    An American Airlines employee is trying again on a claim that the company owes him overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act, telling an Arizona federal judge Friday that the latest version of his complaint shows he's covered by the FLSA, not the Railway Labor Act. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Employer's Intent Key To Wage Theft Prosecution

    The delta between criminal wage theft and civil wage and hour violations is large, but unpacking the differences between them offers important lessons about intent and the power of the penal code to deter bad behavior, attorneys say.

  • May 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Splits PAGA Claims In Macy's Arbitration Fight

    Macy's can't compel arbitration of nonindividual claims in a worker's wage suit brought under California's Private Attorneys General Act, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, saying language in an arbitration pact prevents blending together different types of claims.

  • May 10, 2024

    Workers Say MAC Cosmetics Doesn't Pay OT For Event Prep

    MAC Cosmetics Inc. did not reimburse employees for the time and money spent on makeup, hair and outfit requirements for promotional events and meeting the company's beauty standards, according to a proposed collective action complaint filed in Arizona federal court.

  • May 10, 2024

    Pepperidge Farm Drivers Not Employees, 3rd Circ. Affirms

    Three delivery drivers for Pepperidge Farm are independent contractors, not employees, and thus cannot sue the company for state wage and hour law violations, a Third Circuit panel ruled Friday, saying the drivers' daily responsibilities make it clear they are self-employed.

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Police Officer's Bias Case

    This week, the Second Circuit is scheduled to consider a former Ramapo, New York, police officer's lawsuit claiming the town discriminated against her on the basis of her race and gender when it did not assign her a light duty assignment after she returned to the job from an injury. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 10, 2024

    NYPD K9 Handlers' Overtime Suit Sent To Dog House, For Now

    A group of 11 New York City Police Department dog handlers must revise their unpaid overtime lawsuit to reflect the actual time they allegedly spent at home taking care of their dogs in order to stake a plausible claim for unpaid overtime, a federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    PF Chang's Allowed To Keep 6K-Worker Wage Deal Concealed

    P.F. Chang's can file settlement papers with dollar amounts shielded from public view as the restaurant chain looks to resolve a 5-year-old suit accusing it of cheating more than 6,000 tipped servers out of wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: 9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Chief's Free Speech Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a former police chief's First Amendment case. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 10, 2024

    Workers Push Back On Citizens Bank's Bid For OT Win

    Pennsylvania wage law requires employers to pay workers overtime rates that include all compensation earned, including commissions, a group of workers accusing Citizens Bank of underpaying overtime wages told a federal judge, urging the court to deny the bank's request for a win.

  • May 10, 2024

    3 Cases Poised To Apply High Court's Arbitration Ruling

    Cases that were in the judicial pipeline when the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a ruling on what workers qualify for a carveout from federal arbitration law are poised to be among the first that apply its holding. Here, Law360 discusses three cases that were frozen in anticipation of the high court's decision.

  • May 09, 2024

    Rail Co. Accused Of Retaliation Over FMLA Use

    CSX Transportation Inc. has been hit with a Florida federal lawsuit brought by its workers, who allege in their proposed class action that the rail company discouraged them from lawfully using the Family and Medical Leave Act, including by punishing them for taking advantage of the law.

  • May 09, 2024

    NY Healthcare Co. Gets Worker's Wage Suit Trimmed

    An Albany, New York-based health system can escape, for now, a proposed collective claim alleging it denied workers overtime wages, a federal judge ruled Thursday, while preserving a claim that it forced employees to work through their lunch breaks.

  • May 09, 2024

    Tenn. County Untangles Collective In Wage Suit Ahead Of Trial

    A Tennessee county snagged a partial decertification win in a lawsuit accusing it of not properly paying a variety of workers within its sheriff's office, after a federal judge ruled that the workers' differences in jobs prevent collective treatment.

  • May 09, 2024

    Staffing Cos. Can't Dodge DOL Suit Over Wage Clawbacks

    The U.S. Department of Labor can keep pursuing a suit alleging two staffing agencies drew employees' compensation below minimum wage by implementing contractual clawbacks if employees didn't stay for more than three years, a New York federal judge ruled.

  • May 09, 2024

    Feds' Pay Bias Suit Against Wis. Military Affairs Heads To Trial

    A federal judge refused Thursday to grant the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs a win in a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, saying a jury could find that the state agency lowballed an applicant for a director position because she's a woman.

  • May 09, 2024

    Liquor Co. Ordered To Stop Flouting Law After DOL Wage Deal

    An Indiana federal judge issued an injunction barring a multistate liquor store operator from violating federal labor law after the U.S. Department of Labor accused it of flouting a previous back wage settlement by coercing workers to accept less money than they were owed.

  • May 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Panel Skeptical Of NLRB Hazard Pay Ruling

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned on Thursday a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a Michigan nursing home violated federal labor law with its handling of temporary hazard pay and staffing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with judges appearing skeptical the company had to bargain over the changes.

  • May 09, 2024

    DOL Wage Enforcement Penalties Come Under Scrutiny

    Civil monetary penalties aren’t high enough to deter employers from violating wage and hour laws, Democrats in Congress are saying ahead of planned legislation, though employers’ attorneys argue that existing fines are adequate. Here, Law360 explores the penalties debate.

  • May 09, 2024

    Plumbing Co. Ignoring OT Precedent, 1st Circ. Judge Chides

    A First Circuit judge said Thursday that a plumbing supply distributor arguing that its inside sales representatives don't qualify for overtime pay appears to be "running as fast as you can to get away" from a key recent precedent.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Atty Among 5 Rimon Arrivals On Both Coasts

    Rimon PC has expanded its offices in New Jersey, Philadelphia, Orlando, San Francisco and San Diego with the addition of five attorneys, bolstering its intellectual property, investment management, real estate, employment and litigation capabilities, the firm announced Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Ensuring Child Labor Law Compliance Amid Growing Scrutiny

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    Amid increased attention on child labor law violations, employers should review their policies and practices with respect to the employment of minors, particularly underage migrants who do not have any parents in the U.S., say Felicia O'Connor and Morgan McDonald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Best Practices For Pay Transparency Compliance

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    With conflicting pay transparency and disclosure laws appearing across the country, employers must carefully develop different strategies for discussing compensation with employees, applicants, and off-site workers, disclosing salaries in job ads, and staying abreast of new state and local compliance requirements, says Joy Rosenquist at Littler Mendelson.

  • Calif. Cos. May Have To Reimburse More Remote Work Costs

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    After a California appeals court's recent decision in Thai v. IBM, countless California employers will be required to pay work-related costs incurred by their employees who were sent home during the pandemic, and this could be just the beginning of a reckoning, say Sonya Goodwin at Sauer & Wagner.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Calif. Employers Note: Industrial Welfare Commission Is Back

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    An appropriations bill recently passed in California instructs the Industrial Welfare Commission to reconvene for the first time in 19 years, opening a door for the regulatory body to significantly affect employer operations by strengthening standards for meal and rest breaks, scheduling, record-keeping, and more, say Denisha McKenzie and John Keeney at CDF Labor Law.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Colorado Antitrust Reform Carries Broad State Impact

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    Colorado recently became the latest state to update and expand its antitrust laws, and the new act may significantly affect enforcement and private litigation, particularly when it comes to workers and consumers, says Diane Hazel at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Not A Total Loss For Employer Arbitration

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    Contrary to the conclusion reached in a recent Law360 guest article, the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Adolph v. Uber Technologies did not diminish the benefit of arbitrating employees’ individual Private Attorneys General Act claims, as the very limited ruling does not undermine U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says Steven Katz at Constangy.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • FLSA Collective Actions: Are Courts Still Dancing The 2-Step?

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    In the absence of amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, courts have filled in some of the statute's gaps and established a two-step framework for conditional certification of a class, but recent rulings show signs that courts are ready to hold party plaintiffs to a higher standard if they want to recruit others to join their lawsuits, says Allison Powers at Barack Ferrazzano.

  • Calif. PAGA Ruling Devalues Arbitration For Employers

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    The California Supreme Court’s recent opinion in Adolph v. Uber may lessen employers' appetites for arbitration under the state’s Private Attorneys General Act, because arbitrating an allegedly aggrieved employee’s individual claims is unlikely to dispose of their nonindividual claims, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.