Wage & Hour

  • June 17, 2024

    Property Preservation Co. Settles 15 Misclassification Suits

    A property preservation company told a California federal court it reached a deal to settle 15 suits claiming it owes workers wages after misclassifying them as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Don't Let Farm Org Rewrite Wage Rule Suit, DOL Tells Judge

    A farm group shouldn't be allowed to revise its challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's new wage rule for certain temporary workers, the agency told a Charlotte, North Carolina, federal judge, saying the revision attempt comes too late as the matter is already awaiting the judge's decision.

  • June 17, 2024

    Federal Contractor Wage Bump Gears Up For Supreme Court

    Two outdoor groups urged the Tenth Circuit to press pause on its ruling that President Joe Biden could spike federal contractors' hourly minimum wage, saying they plan to ask for the U.S. Supreme Court's intervention.

  • June 17, 2024

    Delivery Co. Inks $2.9M Deal In Drivers' Misclassification Suit

    A class of package delivery drivers asked a Massachusetts federal judge to sign off on a $2.9 million settlement resolving a lawsuit accusing a delivery company of misclassifying the drivers as independent contractors and illegally docking their pay, saying the average class member will receive $12,000.

  • June 17, 2024

    Supreme Court Won't Revisit Calif. Law Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to revisit a case dealing with the arbitration of claims brought under a California law enabling workers to sue on behalf of the state and other workers for labor violations, an issue the justices decided on in 2022.

  • June 17, 2024

    Justices Pass On Revisiting PAGA Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to take another look at the fate of nonindividual claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act when individual claims go to arbitration in a case involving Uber that was previously before the high court.

  • June 14, 2024

    GOP AGs Demand Stay For DOL's H-2A Protections Rule

    Seventeen Republican attorneys general requested a pause on the effective date for the U.S. Department of Labor's final rule covering foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program, telling the court that the rule provides protections that U.S. citizen agricultural workers lack under federal labor law.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Bill Taking Aim At Model Worker Abuse Awaits Gov.'s Pen

    The New York State Assembly greenlighted a bill now headed for the governor's desk that creates new worker protections for models that aim to rein in industry exploitation, legislation that would build a registry of modeling agencies and require them to act as fiduciaries for their workers.

  • June 14, 2024

    Ill. Cannabis Co.'s Payroll Provider Suit Revived

    An Illinois appeals court breathed new life into a cannabis dispensary operator's negligence and negligent misrepresentation​ lawsuit against its accounting firm for incorrectly telling the company it was overtime-exempt and causing it to underpay employees, saying the claims may have been brought in time.

  • June 14, 2024

    Popeyes Accused Of Skimping On Breaks And Wages

    Popeyes made employees in California work through lunch and rest breaks without appropriate pay and provided them with "confusing" wage statements, according to a putative class action lodged in a Los Angeles court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Healthcare Worker's Solo PAGA Claim Heads To Arbitration

    A California state appeals court ruled an employee's individual wage claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act should be heard in arbitration, overturning a lower court's decision to keep the lawsuit in state court and finding the arbitration agreement encompassed the worker's claims.

  • June 14, 2024

    Former IT Worker Wants Outright Win In FMLA Suit

    A former information technology worker asked a Florida federal court Friday to reconsider a win it denied him in his lawsuit alleging he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, arguing the court should have found his company acted illegally.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Forecast: Class Cert. Args In Four Seasons Layoff Suit

    This week, a New York federal judge will consider a motion to certify a class of former workers at the Four Seasons Hotel New York who claim the hotel violated federal and state law by not notifying them of furloughs and that the hotel denied them contractually required severance. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 14, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for potential settlement approval in a pay stubs class action against Delta Air Lines that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • June 14, 2024

    Disability Care Co., DOL Ink $500K Deal To End Wage Suit

    A Virginia care company for people with intellectual disabilities will pay about $500,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it paid employees a flat rate, leading to minimum wage and overtime violations, according to court documents filed Friday.

  • June 13, 2024

    New Evidence Triggers Amended Misclassification Complaint

    Growers accusing a chicken farm of misclassifying them as independent contractors can amend their suit, a South Carolina federal judge ruled Thursday, agreeing that new evidence they obtained could expand the suit's reach.

  • June 13, 2024

    Republican Sens. Want To Block DOL OT Exemption Rule

    Republican senators unveiled a Congressional Review Act resolution Thursday aiming to roll back the U.S. Department of Labor's new rule increasing the salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for administrative, executive and professional employees, saying the final rule will raise prices and cut jobs.

  • June 13, 2024

    2nd Circ. Reopens Tow Trucker's Wage Suit

    A New York federal court shouldn't have inserted a subsidiary in a proposed class action accusing an auction service provider of paying tow truck drivers late, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday, reviving the suit.

  • June 13, 2024

    Wage Violation Window Narrowed Before Trial

    A group of workers for a sheriff's office can bring evidence at trial that the county they worked for committed wage violations only within the time period covered by the three-year statute of limitations, which is locked at the moment workers opt in, a Tennessee federal judge ruled.

  • June 13, 2024

    Mass. Court Blesses Broad Liability In BMW Dealer Wage Suit

    An intermediate Massachusetts appellate panel on Thursday ruled that a BMW dealership employee can sue not only her direct employer for wage law violations, but also a separate company that manages the dealership.

  • June 13, 2024

    Courts Grow Dubious Of Approval Obligation For FLSA Deals

    The future of Fair Labor Standards Act settlement approvals is increasingly uncertain, as federal district court judges have been departing from precedent by saying parties can privately settle without court approval. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • June 13, 2024

    Perdue Wants Copycat Wage Suit Tossed or Transferred

    Perdue Foods asked a Maryland federal judge Thursday to throw out or transfer to Georgia a chicken grower's suit alleging independent contractor misclassification, saying the claims are identical to another suit in that state the named plaintiff was involved with.

  • June 13, 2024

    Mass. High Court Approves Tipped Wage Ballot Measure

    Massachusetts' highest court on Thursday gave its blessing to a November ballot question asking voters to increase the state's minimum wage for tipped workers, finding that pairing the measure with a provision to allow tip pooling is part of an overall public policy goal to boost wages for all service industry employees.

  • June 13, 2024

    Calif. Residential Care Co. Owes $659K For Wage Infractions

    A Los Angeles residential care company must pay nearly $659,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full wages, the California Labor Commissioner's Office announced Thursday.

  • June 12, 2024

    NM Pot Store Chain Unlawfully Keeps Tips, Budtenders Say

    A cannabis retail chain in New Mexico is accused of unlawfully taking tips from its budtenders under the premise that the money would be donated to a charity, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • What High Court Ruling Means For Sexual Harassment Claims

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    In its recent Smith v. Spizzirri decision, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a district court compelling a case to arbitration is obligated to stay the case rather than dismissing it, but this requirement may result in sexual harassment cases not being heard by appellate courts, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • A Closer Look At Feds' Proposed Banker Compensation Rule

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    A recently proposed rule to limit financial institutions' ability to award incentive-based compensation for risk-taking may progress through the rulemaking process slowly due to the sheer number of regulators collaborating on the rule and the number of issues under consideration, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • DOL's New OT Rule Will Produce Unbalanced Outcomes

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's new salary level for the Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption is about 65% higher than the current threshold and will cause many white collar employees to be classified as nonexempt because they work in a location with a lower cost of living, not because of their duties, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • 3 Wage And Hour Tips For A Post-Chevron World

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    Employers can take three steps to handle day-to-day wage and hour compliance in the event that the U.S. Supreme Court soon reshifts the administrative law landscape by overturning the Chevron doctrine, which could cause a massive sea change in the way we all do business, say Seth Kaufman and Matthew Korn at Fisher Phillips.

  • After Years Of Popularity, PAGA's Fate Is Up In The Air

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    The last two years held important victories for plaintiff-side employment attorneys in California Private Attorneys General Act litigation at the trial and appellate court levels, but this hotbed of activity will quickly lose steam if voters approve a ballot measure in November to enact the California Fair Pay and Employer Accountability Act, says Paul Sherman at Kabat Chapman.

  • One Contract Fix Can Reduce Employer Lawsuit Exposure

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    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling that saved FedEx over $365 million highlights how a one-sentence limitation provision on an employment application or in an at-will employment agreement may be the easiest cost-savings measure for employers against legal claims, say Sara O'Keefe and William Wortel at BCLP.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • What To Expect From The DOL's Final Overtime Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's final overtime rule dramatically increases the salary threshold for white collar workers to be exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, so employers should prioritize identifying the potentially affected positions and strategically consider next steps, say Leslie Selig Byrd and Deryck Van Alstyne at Bracewell.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

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    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Refresher On Employee Qualifications For Summer Interns

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    Before companies welcome interns to their ranks this summer, they should consider the extent to which the interns may be entitled to the same legal protections as employees, including the right to be paid for their hours worked and to receive at least minimum wage and overtime, says Kate LaQuay at Munck Wilson.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.